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The Deli's SXSW Issue 2014 is online!

Read it digitally here.

P.S. 10k free copies of this issue hit the street of Austin during SXSW Music week!





Q&A with AOTM Daisybones, see them live at The Old Court (10.20)

Given that some of the members of Lowell's Daisybones have been playing together for nearly a decade, it would make sense to consider their journey to their exceptionally fine-tuned sound a slow burn. But it doesn't come across that way at all. The explosive, eruptive performances they give with every track feel completely spontaneous. Listening to their 2017 debut LP Gusto is like being trapped in a moment, one that grabs you by the shoulders and shakes you out of whatever funk you've been in until you start dancing. Their most recent single "Choke" follows suit. The anthemic single is a clear example of musical growth, while retaining the same energy. It's no surprise that Daisybones was voted The Deli's artist of the month, as they're surely one of the best bands performing in New England right now. The Deli sat down with Jordan of Daisybones and talked about playing with the same people for years, joint euphemisms, influences, and musical diversity in New England.

Catch Daisybones at The Old Court in Lowell tomorrow (10.20) at 8:15 p.m., and keep an eye out for Beautymark, their next release coming out in three days (10.22). 

I know that most of you met in high school, but that the band fully formed in college. Can you talk more about your origin story, and how the project has changed since then?

Jordan: A.J. and I have been playing together for almost 10 years now. We started off as the two of us playing guitar and drums in his basement, writing absolutely awful songs, but it was something. We've always been in the same project no matter what it was. After a few different members and names, we linked up with Dillon in high school and that's when we started to take it a bit more seriously. We started off by playing the classic emo/pop-punk type of stuff and wrote some absolute bangers, anthems if you will. That changed as we all grew more through music and other factors. Dillon, A.J., and I had a rad practice space that was basically an empty warehouse. We would go there for hours at a time and just write, jam, play Smash Bros. That was probably our biggest growth period in terms of writing. We harnessed all the indie rock energy we could and wrote an album under a different name. Flash forward to freshman year of college, we were starting to write new music and wanted to give ourselves a fresh start. So, we started a new band under a different name and needed something that was outside of the cookie-cutter cliche 'rock band' line up -- by that I mean just guitar, bass, drums. I had met Lucas across the hall in college. He produced music and he was a great piano player, as well. He helped us expand the sonic values of our first album and we wanted to bring that to the stage so he joined us and then daisybones was born.

Where did the name Daisybones come from, and who thought of it?

Jordan: Dillon and I spent about a month at least just shooting random texts to each other. We could probably go back on our phones to that time and it's just endless messages of random words put together that had some kind of ring to it. We came up with probably 100 different band names, but none of them sounded right or were too long, or they were already band names. It seemed like nothing worked. I started to just take the names we had and reorganize the words, and I texted Dillon 'daisybones'. The next day he texted me back saying, "that works. its like euphemism for a joint." And that was that.

Are there any bands or albums that heavily influenced your music-making?

Jordan: This list could go on forever. Directly or indirectly the following bands influenced everything we do: Thee Oh Sees, Animal Collective, The Districts, Vundabar, Vampire Weekend, Sun Club, Kings of Leon, Alvvays, BRONCHO, FIDLAR, White Reaper, Diet Cig, The Frights, Ghostt Bllonde, Arctic Monkeys, Mini Mansions, Queens of the Stone Age, The Buttertones, French Cassettes, And The Kids, Tokyo Police Club, Drowners, among many others.

What is your favorite thing about the New England music scene?

Jordan: The diversity. There is so much music that happens in New England, it's sort of pleasantly overwhelming. Especially in the Lowell area.

What is your least favorite?

Jordan: I think people could put more effort into helping bands from other areas come through and tour. I hear a lot of touring bands say they struggle to get a solid show in Boston or Lowell.

What was your most memorable live show, for reasons good or bad?

Jordan: Personally one of our most memorable shows was a recent house show we played. It was the first venue we played at as Daisybones and we haven't played there in over a year. We had a basement full of people yelling our songs back at us. The crowd was very active and very hype. It was very, very fun to play.

Here at The Deli, we love to talk about gear—we even have a blog dedicated exclusively to pedals! What gear, if any, can you not perform without?

Jordan: I personally have a lot of Earth Quaker Devices on my board. The Hoofreaper, The Afterneath are both pedals I can't play without along with the Green Rhino by Way Huge and of course the TC Electronics' Hall of Fame. Dillon has an absolute boss set up of a Hall of Fame patched into a Big Muff. It's badass.

Last, but not least, what is your favorite thing to order at your local deli?

Jordan: Roast Beef.

Dillon: Ham and Cheese with peanut butter and onions.

A.J.: Just bread.

Lucas: Grilled Cheese.

Listen to tracks by Daisybones and more local artists on The Deli New England's brand new Spotify playlist, Cold Cuts: Sounds of New England.

header image: 
sites/upload-files/imagecache/review_image/2864.jpg
author: 
Lilly Milman
Subtitle (brief and awesome): 
The Deli sat down with Jordan of Daisybones and talked about playing with the same people for years, joint euphemisms, influences, and musical diversity in New England.
Excerpt (short interesting quote from the Q&A): 
"There is so much music that happens in New England, it's sort of pleasantly overwhelming."




A Deli Premiere: single "Greasy Spoon" by former AOTM Birdgangs

Former Deli New England artists of the month Birdgangs, an indie rock quartet from Boston, could be considered coastal traitors. The inform their clean take on classic rock and roll with distinctly West Coast, surfy overtones. This may be most visible in their newest single, "Greasy Spoon" (streaming below), an eclectic tune that is bursting with life. The main riff, written by lead guitarist Matt Bates, sounds like it should be soundtracking your favorite surfer movie. A completely new genre is born when it's directly juxtaposed with the grungy breaks in the track that pull you right back into a Boston basement show. The transitions are at once extremely disorienting and undeniably effective, a nascent appeal to the diverse music scene of the city. The track is also the first to be written by the band since the addition of drummer Fernando Echeverry, according to lead vocalist Jack Davis. He said, "There’s a uniting element to the process that brought the song about. I heard Matt playing the riff that ended up in the song and that was definitely what set it in motion. The lyrics tell a story of an unfortunate misunderstanding between people that leads to some awkward hilarity and delightfully unexpected batches of late-night pancakes.” Birdgangs will be playing their next live show at Opus in Salem at 9 pm. - Lilly Milman, photo by Hannah Blauner

Stream The Deli's exclusive premiere of "Greasy Spoon" below.





Former AOTM Helenor marries pop and psych on second single "Bloodshot Eyes"

Psych meets pop on “Bloodshot Eyes” (streaming below), the newest single from former Deli New England artist of the month Helenor. Irony runs through the core of this track, with the opening lines painting a rather dark image (“Lots of hate will form a crowd / you could get stuck below”) against an arguably more pop arrangement. At its midway point, with the introduction of the first chorus (“Bloodshot eyes / are my friends / they’ll stay with me / ‘till the end,”) the track dives into distortions that eventually give way to a reverb-laden realization (“Is this life / all about / the finish line? / I don’t think it is.”) - Lilly Milman

Listen to Helenor and other local artists on The Deli New England's brand new Spotify playlist, Cold Cuts: Sounds of New England. 





Brother Toaster and Tyler Arnott release wily collaborative album 'Recreational Landscaping'

Recreational Landscaping, a collaborative effort between Brother Toaster and Tyler Arnott (who contributed guitars and auxiliary sounds to Brother Toaster’s previous LP Chucky,) is a wonderful musing on what it means to make music out of the noise. Recorded on a mono microphone while a lawn was being mowed in the background, this project thrives off of the organic. Not only does the stripped back, minimalistic sound create room for both guitarists to riff of one another, but it also draws attention to the intimate details, like the sudden declaration of “I need to tune this” on the end of “Sunrise on the Flowers.” On this album, Brother Toaster and Arnott have tested their luck at trimming the fat and, as a result, created a surprising and wildly fun album that can be left on repeat for hours at a time. With each listen, there’s something new to be found and appreciated; discover it for yourself below. - Lilly Milman

Listen to more tracks from Brother Toaster and more local artists on The Deli New England's brand new Spotify playlist, Cold Cuts: Sounds of New England. 

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