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Friends of Noise hosts music for everyone!

 *pictured: the Woolen Men, taken by Dino Matt

Advocates of all-age safe spaces and music venues, local organization Friends of Noise is doing yet another bit of good to bring music to community... for free. 

From 4pm-8-pm today, Friends of Noise is hosting their "Music For Everyone Day" at Portland City Hall. This is the nonprofit's second attempt at throwing this event, since the initial date had to be rescheduled due to poor air quality caused by the wildfires surrounding the city. Nevertheless, FoN have forged on to bring a wide range of artists to those around the downtown Portland area today.

Young artists are strongly supported by FoN and a couple of them will be taking the stage, like Daniel “D.J. Max” Lasuncet and 15-year-old singer/songwriter JoJo Scott. My Voice Music project BLK + IVY will also perform, along with poet Maurisa Destiny Golden and some of the bigger Portland names. Skull Diver's alternative psych rock is sure to make everyone swoon, while the raw energy of the Woolen Men should perfectly juxtapose the gloominess of today. 

Other youth-oriented organizations and programs were also a part of making this event possible, such as My Voice Music, Outside the Frame, Marrow PDX, Momentum Alliance, SMRYC, the Rock n' Roll Camp for Girls and the Bus Project. It should be noted that water and restrooms are available inside Portland City Hall, but that patrons will have to undergo a back check upon entry. 

If you're looking for something free, fun and inclusive of all-ages and people, Music For Everyone Day is definitely something worth checking out.





StackStock brings music to the Oregon Coast

The Oregon Coast is a beautiful place, with an enjoyably somber air to it for majority of the year. Now that summer is coming to an end, there's one more opportunity to enjoy the coast at its brightest. 

In its inaugural year, StackStock Music Festival takes some of the most popular and pleasant artists coming out of the Pacific Northwest and stages them in Cannon Beach, backdropped by rolling ocean waves at the Haystack Gardens.

Coming from hospitality company owner Ryan Snyder, StackStock's sole purpose is to "bring rock to the town with the rock" and that, he's done well. In collaboration with Live Wire! Radio's Kate Sokoloff and local booker Alicia J. Rose, the trio nabbed some in town favorites like the choral pop of Ages and Ages, harmonic folk from duo Wonderly and some latin-influenced guitar sounds from the Edna Vazquez Acoustic Trio. A dream pop flare will come from Pure Bathing Culture along with some pretty rocking folk ballads from a solo headlining set from Colin Meloy, the lead singer of The Decemberists. An interactive pop set from the OK Chorale PDX will get the festival crowd going as well.

"The North Coast of Oregon is not really on the tour schedule for big name touring acts like Colin Meloy or Pure Bathing Culture," says Snyder. "STACKSTOCK is my way of sharing this incredibly unique music with the community here and our visitors alike."

Saturday's StackStock runs from 1-9pm. Advance sale tickets are $40 and $50 the day of. For directions, ticket purchasing and more information, head to www.STACKSTOCKFEST.com.





Black Belt Eagle Scout opens up with 'Mother of My Children' debut

*Photo by Jeremy Hernandez

The name Katherine Paul may or may not ring any bells. As a musician, Paul has contributed to other Portland acts like Genders and Forest Park, but Paul's recent output as Black Belt Eagle Scout is of particular noteworthiness. 

She doesn't necessarily fancy herself a songwriter, but what she's poured into the songs on her sophomore album Mother of My Children speaks otherwiseto her abilities. Queer and indigenous as part of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community of just outside Anacortes, Washington, Paul was already equipped with intriguing stories and experienes to tell. Once she was hit with a couple losses, Paul had even more emotional material.

“It’s about my best friend. We dated for a really long time, and I thought she was gonna be the mother of my children, quite literally," Paul told Seattle's The Stranger. "And so this past year, I just realized that was never going to happen... I had to let go.”

This, paired with the loss of a dear friend and mentor, bred Mother of My Children. Its songs are cathartic and put together with a particular beautiful sadness. Paul played every instrument herself, from the free Casio that gave"Keyboard" its tunes, to every participating unit that created the loud crashing of "Just Lie Down." 

Everything about Mother of My Children is tender and vulnerable, while still possessing a captivating energy. Stream it below.





'No Future' is a bright light for Rare Monk's future

A lot has changed for Rare Monk over the last few years. Their very first release, the Death By Proxy EP back in 2013, dotted them on Portland's indie rock map, with 2015's self titled EP locking them in place. But as with any classic band story, things got a bit iffy for the Rare Monk in the months to come. They've reached a point now where that iffiness has turned into a stable, fully developed sound that fits the band perfectly.

Rare Monk's most advantageous change came along with their shifted lineup. What started out at a 5-piece with an entirely different guitarist and violinist has now become a 4-piece focusing more on expansive guitar lines and complimenting harmonies thanks to the addition of lead guitarist/vocalist Hugh Jepson.

Along with Dorian Aites (vox, violin, keys, guitar), Rick Buhr on drums and Forest Gallien on bass, the foursome have based their summer release No Future on the lack of control humans have over their personal and collective futures. It's experimental indie rock with a dystopian base that's all sorts of enjoyable for how poignant its theme is.

See Rare Monk perform No Future tomorrow at Bunk Bar for a show they're playing with New York trio Wilsen

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Get carried away with Braun's "Washed Away"

Ben Braun is definitely known for being half of local synth-pop act Mackintosh Braun, but he's also got his toes dipped deep into the solo music pool, and the temperature is just right. With Braun's first solo album Silent Silence, there's a lot of electro-synth-pop and a bit of musical history that makes it enjoyably legendary.

Granted Braun's pedigree, having created many synthy tunes with Mackintosh Braun partner for the last decade, the presence of that style on his album makes total sense. One of the first Silent Silence tracks to be written, "Washed Away" features a guest sax solo from Charlie DeChant. Music buffs may recognize DeChant's skills from the 10 years he spent playing with Hall & Oates. (Braun's father, drummer Michael Braun, also played with Hall & Oates)

To be originally recorded on his laptop, "Washed Away" has a consuming production that's hard to not get caught in. Listen to it below and look out for Silent Silence in October.

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